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PUBLISHED RESEARCH
Melanoma Cell
Adjuvant Nivolumab versus Ipilimumab in Resected Stage III or IV Melanoma

Nivolumab and ipilimumab are immune checkpoint inhibitors that have been approved for the treatment of advanced melanoma. In the United States, ipilimumab has also been approved as adjuvant therapy for melanoma on the basis of recurrence-free and overall survival rates that were higher than those with placebo in a phase 3 trial. The researchers wanted to determine the efficacy of nivolumab versus ipilimumab for adjuvant therapy in patients with resected advanced melanoma.

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Adjuvant Dabrafenib plus Trametinib in Stage III BRAF-Mutated Melanoma

Combination therapy with the BRAF inhibitor dabrafenib plus the MEK inhibitor trametinib improved survival in patients with advanced melanoma with BRAF V600 mutations. It was sought to determine whether adjuvant dabrafenib plus trametinib would improve outcomes in patients with resected, stage III melanoma with BRAF V600 mutations.

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The Burden of Primary Liver Cancer and Underlying Etiologies From 1990 to 2015 at the Global, Regional, and National Level

Liver cancer is among the leading causes of cancer deaths globally. The most common causes for liver cancer include hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and alcohol use.

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Discovery of a new fusion gene class may affect the development of cancer

Cancer researchers have discovered a new class of fusion genes with properties that affect and may drive the development of cancer.

 

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Durvalumab after Chemoradiotherapy in Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

Most patients with locally advanced, unresectable, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have disease progression despite definitive chemoradiotherapy (chemotherapy plus concurrent radiation therapy). This phase 3 study compared the anti-programmed death ligand 1 antibody durvalumab as consolidation therapy with placebo in patients with stage III NSCLC who did not have disease progression after two or more cycles of platinum-based chemoradiotherapy.

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Researchers Tackle Ovarian Cancer Using a Multidisciplinary Approach

September is National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month. Ovarian cancer is among the most deadly of all cancers, though because of less awareness, most cities won’t be as blanketed in teal (ovarian cancer’s awareness color) as they are bathed in pink for October’s focus on breast cancer. But researchers at the Harper Cancer Research Institute, which is a collaboration between the University of Notre Dame and the Indiana University School of Medicine South Bend (IUSM-SB), are working with community partners to not only foster awareness of ovarian cancer, but to develop tests for early detection, create novel chemotherapies, and target the Holy Grail: A cure.

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The effect of health insurance on childhood cancer survival in the United States

The effect of health insurance on childhood cancer survival has not been well studied. Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) data, this study was designed to assess the association between health insurance status and childhood cancer survival.

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Significance of interleukin-6 (IL-6) in breast cancer (review)

Cytokines are factors that are known to have both tumor-promoting and inhibitory effects on breast cancer growth depending presumably on their relative concentrations and the presence of other modulating factors. Different cytokines play an important role in controlling the immune system. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a pleiotropic cytokine with obviously tumor-promoting and tumor-inhibitory effects. 

 

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The Cancer Genes Needed for Immunotherapy Response

Using a large CRISPR-based screen, researchers find possible genetic culprits for patients not having success with immune checkpoint inhibitors. 

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Researchers look to improve detection of skin cancer lacking pigment melanin

UNC Lineberger researchers led by Nancy Thomas, MD, PhD, have identified key features linked to amelanotic melanoma, a form of skin cancer that lacks the brown or black color that stems from the pigment melanin.

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High-fat diet might raise lung cancer risk

Findings from this large, international cohort consortium suggest that modifying dietary fat intake (ie, replacing saturated fat with polyunsaturated fat) may reduce lung cancer risk, particularly among smokers and for squamous cell and small cell carcinoma.

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