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Balanced diet may be key to cancer survival

Eating a nutritionally balanced high-quality diet may lower a cancer patient's risk of dying by as much as 65%, new research suggests.

Pancreatic cancer often spreads, forming metastases in the liver or lungs. The prognosis is better for patients with metastases in the lungs. However, the organ that is more likely to be affected depends on the cancer cells' ability to alter their characteristics and shape - as a research team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has discovered

Studying two rare inherited cancer syndromes, scientists have found the cancers are driven by a breakdown in how cells repair their DNA. The discovery suggests a promising strategy for treatment with drugs recently approved for other forms of cancer, said the researchers.

Researchers report that along with sharp decreases in hormone-related cancers, the risk for colorectal cancer increased by more than twofold.

 

Scientists in Spain have discovered a mechanism that promotes inflammation-related bowel cancer and could offer new treatment targets.

Eating a nutritionally balanced high-quality diet may lower a cancer patient's risk of dying by as much as 65%, new research suggests.

American researchers reported in a preclinical models that they can amplify macrophage immune responses against cancer using a self-assembling supramolecule.

MicroRNAs are small non-coding pieces of genetic material that are involved in the regulation of gene expression.  The research team found two microRNA activity-based biomarkers that can help indicate which patients may have a better rather than worse patient prognosis.

A sticky protien found outside cells may be the reason behind breast cancer growth.

John Ryan is just one of the miracles to emerge from the Johns Hopkins cancer unit in Baltimore. An immunotherapy treatment — highly effective in a minority of patients — saved his life after a lung cancer diagnosis.

Cancer researchers have shown that some patients with T-cell leukaemia produce too much of the BCL-2 protein. Cancer cells take advantage of this ‘survival protein’ which allows them to escape chemotherapy. A drug suppressing this BCL-2 shows promising results.

 

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